Vizify sorts your info (linkedin, facebook, twitter, instagram, etc) into a interactive graphic bio, so you don’t have to… neat!

via Vizify

fastcompany:

In our upcoming October design issue, one of the many fascinating feature stories we’ve lined up is a lengthy profile of Pinterest and its elusive CEO, Ben Silbermann. That story goes live later this week, but until then, here’s a teaser, in the form of an infographic about Pinterest, created by Fast Company’s staff and designed by our own Ted Keller.

In this profusion of figures, you find out a few key things about the image-sharing service. For one, it’s dominated by women. Second, something about its layout and culture stokes an enormous buying impulse. And third, major brands are getting in on the act. It’s not a stretch to say that soon, at least on retail sites, a Pinterest button might become as ubiquitous as a Facebook Like. Check out the full infographic via the link below.

Infographic: The Astounding Power Of Pinterest

npr:

There is increasing awareness of cities as a defining trait of humanity and their importance to our health, economy and the environment. Here, some basic nuts and bolts about cities and the people who live, drive, work and play in them. via At Work And At Play, How Cities Stack Up 
Credit: Nelson Hsu, Natalie Jones, Julia Ro, Tanya Ballard Brown / NPR

npr:

There is increasing awareness of cities as a defining trait of humanity and their importance to our health, economy and the environment. Here, some basic nuts and bolts about cities and the people who live, drive, work and play in them. via At Work And At Play, How Cities Stack Up

Credit: Nelson Hsu, Natalie Jones, Julia Ro, Tanya Ballard Brown / NPR

Beautiful infographic: we like the use of patterns/hatches.

via Parks of the World & Co.Design

From the top: Infographic (2009) by Ross Crooks via mint; Infographic (2009) from the NY Times and Cool Infographic; Photo of Tom Curley, retiring Associated Press CEO in an interview with Joe Strupp.

The Big News this year - 2012 - and since 2008 … is NEWS, from the forecasting of a gloomy future of print newspapers in 2008, as the US-based infographics shows, to a new obsession (healthy?) with a consuming of the news that engulfs our lives, and the shifting of news”paper” industry to digital. Various sources report:

According to Monocle’s culture editor, Robert Bound:

"Now, what was there more of in 2011 than in any other year in history? What was the gift that kept on giving, often after you wished it wouldn’t? News. There was so much news that people were insulating their lofts with footage from Benghazi, throwing another log of Greek debt on the fire and blaming freshly fallen reports from the London riots on getting into work late, as if it were a freak snowstorm. The amount of man-hours lost to industry due to news-sickness was in the hundreds of billions of euros (possibly).

In 2012, it’s almost certain that lots of things, again, will happen and we’ll be there sucking it up like a race of bulletin-devouring Dysons, a master-race of greedy Henry the Hoovers, gurgling on the carpet-fluff of eurozone squabbles and football gossip. We’re all going to be watching the news, all year. That’s all we have left: an endless cycle of news, fresh from the wires, squiggling at us through the Twittersphere and rolling down the mountain from the again-mighty news organisations. News will be coming at us like a besuited and coiff-haired bullet; we’re going to be wiping squashed news remnants off our radiator grille as we just try to get somewhere safe, somewhere where they don’t know what the outcome of the Egyptian elections is likely to be and are ignorant of who’s topping the medal table in London’s Olympics.

So invest in the news. Make some of your own, perhaps. Pick it, pickle it, bottle it, sell it. With debts, crises, crashes, riots, elections, dictators-a-toppling, nominees-a-running and sprinters-a-running, there’s a rich seam of this gold-rush stuff that could have your name on it.

via Monocle

So agrees retiring Associated Press CEO, Tom Curley:

“The market for news traditionally defined is growing, it’s stronger than ever, there are more people engaged with news more times a day and in more countries than ever before. The overall market is strong. The challenge is the revenue side and how to raise revenues. There’s obviously a shifting taking place. Some of that shift has involved sending money from traditional media to web players so we all have to figure out what relevance means for the news world.”

via what’s next: innovation in newspapers and jimromenesko

More news about newspapers:

"Paper houses - USA [Property]

During the bleakest years for American downtowns in the 1970s and 1980s newspapers were often among the only big-city businesses not to flee to the suburbs. But now, as the media business quivers and downtown property becomes more desirable, iconic newspaper headquarters are increasingly attractive prospects for developers looking to convert the well-located sturdy buildings for new uses.”

Read more on Monocle

And a bookshop bucking the trend: Tsutaya Books, Tokyo, (via Monocle).

What Clay Shirky has to say about "Newspaper, Paywalls and Core Users". One of the better quotes is “form follows funding”.

staff:

Neat! AddThis just published their 2011 stats on “sharing” across the web.
It looks like you guys have been busy. :)

staff:

Neat! AddThis just published their 2011 stats on “sharing” across the web.

It looks like you guys have been busy. :)

An epic infographic on the way 5 different generations live with media throughout their day. Zoom in to the full visual here…
via PSFK

An epic infographic on the way 5 different generations live with media throughout their day. Zoom in to the full visual here

via PSFK

theatlanticvideo:

this would be awesome.
tanya77:

thesochillnetwork:

Yes, for the love of god yes

YES, YES, YES, YES, YES, YES, YES, YES, YES, YES, YES, YES, YES, YES, YES, YES, YES.

theatlanticvideo:

this would be awesome.

tanya77:

thesochillnetwork:

Yes, for the love of god yes

YES, YES, YES, YES, YES, YES, YES, YES, YES, YES, YES, YES, YES, YES, YES, YES, YES.

(Source: thesochillnetwork)

curiositycounts:

Hunch releases more counter-intuitive correlations

curiositycounts:

Hunch releases more counter-intuitive correlations

(Source: curiositycounts)

Richard Florida of The Atlantic speaks of the role of the creative classes in current revolts occurring throughout the Middle East:
"The highest percentages of the creative class — in the range of 40 to  45 percent — are found in wealthy, advanced nations like the  Netherlands, Singapore, Australia, Scandinavia, Belgium, Germany, the  United Kingdom and Canada.  Egypt’s creative class comprises roughly a  third (33.1%) of its workforce, on par with the United States (34.8%).  Only Israel — where the creative class makes up 40 percent of the  workforce — has a higher creative class share in the Middle East.  The  creative class looms larger than one might expect, numbering one in five  workers in Saudi Arabia (23.2%), the United Arab Emirates (UAE) (22%),  Qatar (21.8%), Syria (21.8%) and Algeria (21.4%). These levels are  higher than in the rapidly growing nation of Brazil (18.4%) and roughly  triple that of China (7.4%), the world’s second largest economy.
via The Atlantic

Richard Florida of The Atlantic speaks of the role of the creative classes in current revolts occurring throughout the Middle East:

"The highest percentages of the creative class — in the range of 40 to 45 percent — are found in wealthy, advanced nations like the Netherlands, Singapore, Australia, Scandinavia, Belgium, Germany, the United Kingdom and Canada.  Egypt’s creative class comprises roughly a third (33.1%) of its workforce, on par with the United States (34.8%). Only Israel — where the creative class makes up 40 percent of the workforce — has a higher creative class share in the Middle East.  The creative class looms larger than one might expect, numbering one in five workers in Saudi Arabia (23.2%), the United Arab Emirates (UAE) (22%), Qatar (21.8%), Syria (21.8%) and Algeria (21.4%). These levels are higher than in the rapidly growing nation of Brazil (18.4%) and roughly triple that of China (7.4%), the world’s second largest economy.

via The Atlantic

Interesting…
ibmsocialbiz:


The 2010 Social Business Landscape. Full version

via radstake:

Interesting…

ibmsocialbiz:

The 2010 Social Business Landscape. Full version

via radstake:

Chromaroma Visualisations from Mudlark on Vimeo.

Chromaroma lets visualises your oyster or bike key usage, introducing interactive games and rewards to do with your journey - cool, but could be cooler…

Check out Chromaroma…

via Chromaroma Visualisations in Vimeo

Statistics are not always about numbers…

via edthinks:

Ever wondered what the $549 Billion dollar American defence budget looks like if represented by 88,458 Abrahm M1 tanks? Watch Softwar by Moustachce via infosthetics.com…

Infographics overload - wrap your head around this!! I’ll be getting the book “Everything Explained Through Flowcharts” by flowchart king Doogie Horner when it is out in October…
via Fast Company

Infographics overload - wrap your head around this!! I’ll be getting the book “Everything Explained Through Flowcharts” by flowchart king Doogie Horner when it is out in October


via Fast Company